Goethe: Helena

Although we are concentrating on the Third Act, Faust's appreciation of legend's most beautiful woman begins much earlier, perhaps as early as the Hexenkueche scene where he is thoroughly enraptured by a woman's image in
Although we are concentrating on the Third Act, Faust's appreciation of legend's most beautiful woman begins much earlier, perhaps as early as the Hexenkueche scene where he is thoroughly enraptured by a woman's image in a magical mirror. It drives him crazy, he says (2456), particularly since he has to stay at a certain distance to keep it in proper focus (2434); can you see Mephisto's mischievous smile at this bit of enforced "disinterested contemplation"? Woman is God's final art work, the true Crown of Creation, we learn from Schiller's Princess Eboli; Mephisto seems to say as much, and Faust like most men needs no convincing. We can't be sure that this is indeed Helen, we (and Faust) have yet to meet her. She remains nameless but, by any name, would be as sweet.
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Metadaten
Author:Herbert Deinert
URN:urn:nbn:de:hebis:30-1147441
URL:http://courses.cit.cornell.edu/hd11/Helena.html
Document Type:Working Paper
Language:English
Date of Publication (online):2010/02/08
Year of first Publication:2010
Publishing Institution:Univ.-Bibliothek Frankfurt am Main
Release Date:2010/02/08
SWD-Keyword:Helena; Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
Note:
Herbert Deinert (Professor of German Studies, Emeritus) Department of German Studies, Cornell University, Ithaca NY 14853. Zusätzliches Material findet sich unter: http://courses.cit.cornell.edu/hd11/
HeBIS PPN:223658693
Dewey Decimal Classification:832 Deutsche Dramen
Sammlungen:GiNDok
BDSL-Classification:BDSL-Klassifikation: 13.00.00 Goethezeit > 13.14.00 Zu einzelnen Autoren
Licence (German):License Logo Veröffentlichungsvertrag für Publikationen

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