The Systematization of Tagalog Morphosyntax

In the last two decades Philippine languages, and of these especially Tagalog, have acquired a prominent place in linguistic theory. A centra1 role in this discussion was played by two papers written by Schachter (1976 a
In the last two decades Philippine languages, and of these especially Tagalog, have acquired a prominent place in linguistic theory. A centra1 role in this discussion was played by two papers written by Schachter (1976 and 1977), who was inspired by Keenan's artcle on the subject from 1976. The most recent contributions on this topic have been from de Wolff (1988) and Shibatani (1988), both of which were published in a collection of essays, edited by Shibatani, with the title Passive and Voice. These works, and several works in-between, deal with the focus system specific to Philippine languages. The main discussion centers around the fact that Philippine languages contain a basic set of 5 to 7 affix focus forms. Their exact number varies not only in the secondary literature, but in the primary sources, i.e. Tagalog grammars, as well, where considerable differences in the number of affix focus forms can be found. All of these works, however, do agree on one point: the Philippine focus system basica1ly consists of agent, patient (=goal or object), benefactive, locative, and instrumental affix forms. Schachter/Otanes (1972) list a number of further forms, and in Drossard (1983 and 1984) we tried to show (in an attempt similar to those of Sapir 1917 and Klimov 1977) that the main criterion for a systematization of the Philippine focus system consists in the difference between the active and stative domains, an attempt wruch in our opinion was largely misunderstood (cf. the brief remarks in Shibatani (1988) and de Wolff (1988). The present paper is thus, on the one hand, an attempt to repeat and clarify our earlier position, and on the other, a further step towards such a systematization. A first step in this direction was an article on resultativity in Tagalog from 1991. In the present paper this approach will be extended to reciprocity. In the process we will show that it is valid to make a distinction between an active (=controlled action) vs. a stative (=limited controlled action) domain. First, however, we will take a brief look at what makes up the active and stative voice systems.
show moreshow less

Download full text files

Export metadata

  • Export Bibtex
  • Export RIS

Additional Services

    Share in Twitter Search Google Scholar
Metadaten
Author:Werner Drossard
URN:urn:nbn:de:hebis:30:3-243369
ISSN:1615-1496
Series (Serial Number):Arbeitspapier / Institut für Sprachwissenschaft, Universität Köln (N.F. 19)
Publisher:Allgemeine Sprachwissenschaft, Institut für Linguistik, Universität zu Köln
Place of publication:Köln
Document Type:Working Paper
Language:English
Year of first Publication:1994
Publishing Institution:Univ.-Bibliothek Frankfurt am Main
Release Date:2012/02/22
SWD-Keyword:Morphosyntax; Stativ <Grammatik>; Tagalog
Pagenumber:19
Institutes:Extern
Dewey Decimal Classification:499 Austronesische und andere Sprachen
Sammlungen:Linguistik
Linguistic-Classification:Linguistik-Klassifikation: Syntax
Linguistik-Klassifikation: Morphologie / Morphology
Licence (German):License Logo Veröffentlichungsvertrag für Publikationen

$Rev: 11761 $