Efficient lysis of rhabdomyosarcoma cells by cytokine-induced killer cells: implications for adoptive immunotherapy after allogeneic stem cell transplantation

Background Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common soft tissue sarcoma in childhood and has a poor prognosis. Here we assessed the capability of ex vivo expanded cytokine-induced killer cells to lyse both alveolar and embryo
Background Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common soft tissue sarcoma in childhood and has a poor prognosis. Here we assessed the capability of ex vivo expanded cytokine-induced killer cells to lyse both alveolar and embryonic rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines and investigated the mechanisms involved.

Design and Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from six healthy donors were used to generate and expand cytokine-induced killer cells. The phenotype and composition of these cells were determined by multiparameter flow cytometry, while their cytotoxic effect against rhabdomyosarcoma cells was evaluated by a europium release assay.

Results Cytokine-induced killer cells efficiently lysed cells from both rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines. Antibody-mediated masking of either NKG2D molecule on cytokine-induced killer cells or its ligands on rhabdomyosarcoma cells (major histocompatibility antigen related chain A and B and UL16 binding protein 2) diminished this effect by 50%, suggesting a major role for the NKG2D molecule in rhabdomyosarcoma cell killing. No effect was observed after blocking CD11a, CD3 or TCRαβ molecules on cytokine-induced killer cells or CD1d on rhabdomyosar-coma cells. Remarkably, cytokine-induced killer cells used tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) to activate caspase-3, as the main caspase responsible for the execution of apoptosis. Accordingly, blocking TRAIL receptors on embryonic rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines significantly reduced the anti-tumor effect of cytokine-induced killer cells. About 50% of T cells within the cytokine-induced killer population had an effector memory phenotype, 20% had a naïve phenotype and approximately 30% of the cells had a central memory phenotype. In addition, cytokine-induced killer cells expressed low levels of activation-induced markers CD69 and CD137 and demonstrated a low alloreactive potential.

Conclusions Our data suggest that cytokine-induced killer cells may be used as a novel adoptive immunotherapy for the treatment of patients with rhabdomyosarcoma after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.
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Metadaten
Author:Selim Kuçi, Eva Rettinger, Bernhard Voß, Gerrit Weber, Miriam Stais, Hermann Kreyenberg, Andre Willasch, Zyrafete Kuçi, Ewa Koscielniak, Stephan Klöss, Dorothee von Laer, Thomas Klingebiel, Peter Bader
URN:urn:nbn:de:hebis:30:3-266005
DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.3324/haematol.2009.019885
ISSN:1592-8721
ISSN:0390-6078
Pubmed Id:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=20378565
Parent Title (English):Haematologica
Publisher:Ferrata Storti Foundation
Place of publication:Pavia
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Date of Publication (online):2010/04/07
Date of first Publication:2010/04/07
Publishing Institution:Univ.-Bibliothek Frankfurt am Main
Release Date:2012/11/13
Volume:95
Pagenumber:8
First Page:1579
Last Page:1586
Institutes:Medizin
Georg-Speyer-Haus
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medizin und Gesundheit
Sammlungen:Universitätspublikationen
Licence (German):License Logo Veröffentlichungsvertrag für Publikationen

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