On the potential vegetation feedbacks that enhance phosphorus availability : insights from a process-based model linking geological and ecological time scales [Discussion paper]

In old and heavily weathered soils, the availability of P might be so small that the primary production of plants is limited. However, plants have evolved several mechanisms to actively take up P from the soil or mine it
In old and heavily weathered soils, the availability of P might be so small that the primary production of plants is limited. However, plants have evolved several mechanisms to actively take up P from the soil or mine it to overcome this limitation. These mechanisms involve the active uptake of P mediated by mycorrhiza, biotic de-occlusion through root clusters, and the biotic enhancement of weathering through root exudation. The objective of this paper is to investigate how and where these processes contribute to alleviate P limitation on primary productivity. To do so, we propose a process-based model accounting for the major processes of the carbon, water, and P cycle including chemical weathering at the global scale. We use simulation experiments to assess the relative importance of the different uptake mechanisms to alleviate P limitation on biomass production. Implementing P limitation on biomass synthesis allows the assessment of the efficiencies of biomass production across different ecosystems.
We find that active P-uptake is an essential mechanism for sustaining P availability on long time scales, whereas biotic de-occlusion might serve as a buffer on time scales shorter than 10 000 yr. Although active P uptake is essential for reducing P losses by leaching, humid lowland soils reach P limitation after around 100 000 yr of soil evolution. Given the generalized modeling framework, our model results compare reasonably with observed or independently estimated patterns and ranges of P concentrations in soils and vegetation. Furthermore, our simulations suggest that P limitation might be an important driver of biomass production efficiency (the fraction of the gross primary productivity used for biomass growth), and that vegetation on older soils becomes P-limited leading to a smaller biomass production efficiency.
With this study, we provide a theoretical basis for investigating the responses of terrestrial ecosystems to P availability linking geological and ecological time scales under different environmental settings.
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Metadaten
Author:Corina Buendía, Susanne Arens, Thomas Hickler, Steven Ian Higgins, Philipp Porada, Axel Kleidon
URN:urn:nbn:de:hebis:30:3-329759
DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.5194/bgd-10-19347-2013
ISSN:1810-6277
Parent Title (English):Biogeosciences discussions
Publisher:European Geosciences Union
Place of publication:Katlenburg-Lindau
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Date of Publication (online):2013/12/10
Date of first Publication:2013/12/10
Publishing Institution:Universitätsbibliothek Johann Christian Senckenberg
Release Date:2014/02/03
Volume:10
Pagenumber:61
First Page:19347
Last Page:19407
Note:
© Author(s) 2013. This work is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. 
HeBIS PPN:363865209
Institutes:Geowissenschaften
Biodiversität und Klima Forschungszentrum (BiK-F)
Dewey Decimal Classification:550 Geowissenschaften
570 Biowissenschaften; Biologie
Sammlungen:Universitätspublikationen
Sondersammelgebiets-Volltexte
Licence (German):License LogoCreative Commons - Namensnennung 3.0

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