Cortical temperature change : a tool for modulating brain states?

Periods of rhythmic slow-wave activity during physiological slow-wave sleep or induced by anesthesia are characterized by a waxing and waning of spontaneous neuronal firing coordinated between cortex and thalamus. This a
Periods of rhythmic slow-wave activity during physiological slow-wave sleep or induced by anesthesia are characterized by a waxing and waning of spontaneous neuronal firing coordinated between cortex and thalamus. This activity is generated in the cortex but influences neuronal excitability and stimulus–response properties of neuronal networks throughout the brain (Steriade et al., 1993; Stroh et al., 2013; McGinley et al., 2015b). The corresponding low-frequency component of field potential recordings reflects alternating active states, in which cells are depolarized and synaptic activity is high, and silent states with hyperpolarized membrane potentials and low synaptic activity (Steriade et al., 2001; Timofeev et al., 2001). In contrast, waking is generally associated with continuous depolarization of cortical neurons, resulting in persistent activity (Destexhe et al., 2007; Sheroziya and Timofeev, 2015) and suppression of silent states (Steriade et al., 2001; McGinley et al., 2015b). In their recent study, Sheroziya and Timofeev (2015) demonstrated that moderate cortical cooling (to 29–31°C) of lightly ketamine/xylazin (ket/xyl) anesthetized or non-anesthetized mice reversibly diminished silent states and induced a persistent active state of the cortex. Mild heating (to 39–40°C), in contrast, increased rhythmicity of slow waves. Under deep ket/xyl anesthesia, cortical cooling disrupted slow waves and promoted bursts of activity correlated with thalamic firing. Local cooling of somatosensory cortex was shown to be sufficient to induce a shift from slow-wave to wide-spread persistent cortical activity, extending to the thalamus as well as the contralateral hemisphere. These results suggest that cortical temperature change can be used as a bidirectional and reversible tool for investigating global brain state fluctuations, and provide evidence that the thalamocortical network rapidly reacts upon local depolarization of a small neuronal population with wide-spread shifts of brain state. ...
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Metadaten
Author:Miriam Schwalm, Curtis Easton
URN:urn:nbn:de:hebis:30:3-452590
DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/ENEURO.0096-16.2016
ISSN:2373-2822
Pubmed Id:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=27390773
Parent Title (English):eNeuro
Publisher:Society for Neuroscience
Place of publication:Washington, DC
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Year of Completion:2016
Date of first Publication:2016/06/10
Publishing Institution:Universitätsbibliothek Johann Christian Senckenberg
Release Date:2017/12/22
Tag:brain states; epilepsy; neuromodulation; sleep; slow-wave rhythms; waking state
Volume:3
Issue:ENEURO.0096-16.2016
Pagenumber:4
First Page:1
Last Page:4
Note:
Copyright © 2016 Schwalm and Easton This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International, which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium provided that the original work is properly attributed.
HeBIS PPN:428604358
Institutes:Medizin
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medizin und Gesundheit
Sammlungen:Universitätspublikationen
Licence (German):License LogoCreative Commons - Namensnennung 4.0

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