In vivo cellular reactions to different biomaterials—physiological and pathological aspects and their consequences

Biomaterials are widely used in guided bone regeneration (GBR) and guided tissue regeneration (GTR). After application, there is an interaction between the host immune system and the implanted biomaterial, leading to a b
Biomaterials are widely used in guided bone regeneration (GBR) and guided tissue regeneration (GTR). After application, there is an interaction between the host immune system and the implanted biomaterial, leading to a biomaterial-specific cellular reaction. The present review focuses on cellular reactions to numerous biomaterials in vivo with consideration of different implantation models and microenvironments in different species, such as subcutaneous implantation in mice and rats, a muscle model in goats and a femur model in rabbits. Additionally, cellular reactions to different biomaterials in various clinical indications within the oro-maxillofacial surgical field were considered. Two types of cellular reactions were observed. There was a physiological reaction with the induction of only mononuclear cells and a pathological reaction with the induction of multinucleated giant cells (MNGCs). Attention was directed to the frequently observed MNGCs and consequences of their appearance within the implantation region. MNGCs have different subtypes. Therefore, the present review addresses the different morphological phenotypes observed within the biomaterial implantation bed and discusses the critical role of MNGCs, their subtypes and their precursors as well as comparing the characteristics and differences between biomaterial-related MNGCs and osteoclasts. Polymeric biomaterials that only induced mononuclear cells underwent integration and maintained their integrity, while polymeric biomaterials that induced MNGCs underwent disintegration with material breakdown and loss of integrity. Hence, there is a question regarding whether our attention should be directed to alternative biological concepts, in combination with biomaterials that induce a physiological mononuclear cellular reaction to optimize biomaterial-based tissue regeneration.
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Metadaten
Author:Sarah Al-Maawi, Anna Orlowska, Robert Alexander Sader, Charles James Kirkpatrick, Shahram Ghanaati
URN:urn:nbn:de:hebis:30:3-458988
DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.smim.2017.06.001
ISSN:1044-5323
ISSN:1096-3618
Pubmed Id:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=28647227
Parent Title (English):Seminars in immunology
Publisher:Academic Press
Place of publication:London
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Year of Completion:2017
Date of first Publication:2017/06/21
Publishing Institution:Universitätsbibliothek Johann Christian Senckenberg
Release Date:2018/04/17
Tag:Cellular inflammatory response; Disintegration; Integration; Multinucleated giant cells; Tissue engineering; Vascularization
Volume:29
Pagenumber:13
First Page:49
Last Page:61
Note:
© 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/BY/4.0/).
HeBIS PPN:432095403
Institutes:Medizin
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medizin und Gesundheit
Sammlungen:Universitätspublikationen
Licence (German):License LogoCreative Commons - Namensnennung 4.0

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