Traumatic injury pattern is of equal relevance as injury severity for experimental (poly)trauma modeling

This study aims to elaborate the relevance of trauma severity and traumatic injury pattern in different multiple and/or polytrauma models by comparing five singular trauma to two different polytrauma (PT) models with hig
This study aims to elaborate the relevance of trauma severity and traumatic injury pattern in different multiple and/or polytrauma models by comparing five singular trauma to two different polytrauma (PT) models with high and one multiple trauma (MT) model with low injury-severity score (ISS). The aim is to provide a baseline for reducing animal harm according to 3Rs by providing less injury as possible in polytrauma modeling. Mice were randomly assigned to 10 groups: controls (Ctrl; n = 15), Sham (n = 15); monotrauma groups: hemorrhagic shock (HS; n = 15), thoracic trauma (TxT; n = 18), osteotomy with external fixation (Fx; n = 16), bilateral soft tissue trauma (bSTT; n = 16) or laparotomy (Lap; n = 16); two PT groups: PT I (TxT + HS + Fx; ISS = 18; n = 18), PT II (TxT + HS + Fx + Lap; ISS = 22; n = 18), and a MT group (TxT + HS + bSTT + Lap, ISS = 13; n = 18). Activity and mortality were assessed. Blood gas analyses and organ damage markers were determined after 6 h. Significant mortality occurred in TxT, PT and MT (11.7%). Activity decreased significantly in TxT, HS, both polytrauma and MT vs. Ctrl/Sham. PT-groups and MT had significantly decreased activity vs. bsTT, Lap or Fx. MT had significantly lower pCO2 vs. Ctrl/Sham, Lap or bsTT. Transaminases increased significantly in PT-groups and MT vs. Ctrl, Sham or monotrauma. Traumatic injury pattern is of comparable relevance as injury severity for experimental multiple or (poly)trauma modeling.
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Author:Bing Yang, Katrin Bundkirchen, Christian Krettek, Borna Relja, Claudia Neunaber
URN:urn:nbn:de:hebis:30:3-493008
DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-42085-1
ISSN:2045-2322
Pubmed Id:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=30952899
Parent Title (English):Scientific reports
Publisher:Macmillan Publishers Limited, part of Springer Nature
Place of publication:[London]
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Year of Completion:2019
Date of first Publication:2019/04/05
Publishing Institution:Universitätsbibliothek Johann Christian Senckenberg
Release Date:2019/04/09
Tag:Acute inflammation; Experimental models of disease; Translational research
Volume:9
Issue:1, Art. 5706
Pagenumber:12
First Page:1
Last Page:12
Note:
Open Access: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
HeBIS PPN:450817709
Institutes:Medizin
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medizin und Gesundheit
Sammlungen:Universitätspublikationen
Licence (German):License LogoCreative Commons - Namensnennung 4.0

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