Things I learned from the "Book of Ruth" : diasporic reading of queer conversions

Ruth Preser's essay 'Things I Learned from the "Book of Ruth": Diasporic Reading of Queer Conversions' performs a queer appropriation of history. The "Book of Ruth" is a biblical narrative that opens with two women, Naom
Ruth Preser's essay 'Things I Learned from the "Book of Ruth": Diasporic Reading of Queer Conversions' performs a queer appropriation of history. The "Book of Ruth" is a biblical narrative that opens with two women, Naomi the Israelite, a bereaved woman who wishes to return from Moab to Judea, and her no-longer-daughter-in-law Ruth the Moabite, who pledges to follow Naomi, turning away from her gods and people. This laconic tale of nomadic intimacies and speech-acts of pledges and conversions has become an iconic narrative and a seminal text in Judaism, and it has also been appropriated by contemporary feminist and lesbian readings. Indeed, since it is not fully narrated but rather full of gaps, voids, and 'ghostly matters', the "Book of Ruth" provides apt ground and a malleable vessel for contemporary appropriation by stories seeking incarnation beyond linear or teleological constraints. In Preser's 'palimpsest reading', the biblical tale continues to communicate a story of successful assimilation of the poor and the foreign, and of a 'home-coming', but it is troubled by displacement, unresolved diasporic longing, and an acute and continuous sense of vulnerability. Thinking with Avery Gordon's modality of haunting, Preser's reading aims to understand contemporary forms of dispossession and their impact, especially when their oppressive nature is denied. It reflects on what kind of theory might emerge by remobilizing the category of 'home' through its de-constitution, through movement rather than destination, through disintegration rather than determination. Troubled by questions of race, nomadism, gender, and sexuality, in an era when (some) bodies may traverse national, sexual, and class borders, Preser's investigation asks what happens to bodies that continuously signify precarity and loss.
show moreshow less

Download full text files

Export metadata

  • Export Bibtex
  • Export RIS

Additional Services

    Share in Twitter Search Google Scholar
Metadaten
Author:Ruth Preser
URN:urn:nbn:de:hebis:30:3-552552
URL:https://www.ici-berlin.org/oa/ci-11/preser_queer-conversions.pdf
DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.37050/ci-11_03
ISBN:978-3-85132-854-7
ISSN:2627-731X
Parent Title (English):De/constituting wholes : towards partiality without parts / edited by Manuele Gragnolati and Christoph F.E. Holzhey ; Cultural inquiry ; vol. 11
Publisher:Turia + Kant
Place of publication:Wien ; Berlin
Document Type:Part of a Book
Language:English
Year of Completion:2020
Year of first Publication:2017
Publishing Institution:Universitätsbibliothek Johann Christian Senckenberg
Release Date:2020/07/28
Tag:Belonging (Social Psychology); Books mentioned in the Bible; Displacement; Homosexuality; Jewish Diaspora; Loss; Old Testament
SWD-Keyword:Bibel. Rut; Diaspora <Religion>; Homosexualität; Judentum; Zugehörigkeit
Pagenumber:19
First Page:47
Last Page:65
Dewey Decimal Classification:220 Bibel
800 Literatur und Rhetorik
Sammlungen:Jüdische Studien
CompaRe | Allgemeine und Vergleichende Literaturwissenschaft
ICI Berlin
Licence (German):License LogoCreative Commons - Namensnennung-Weitergabe unter gleichen Bedingungen

$Rev: 11761 $