Motor control stabilisation exercise for non-specific low back pain patients : a prospective meta-analysis with multilevel meta-regressions on intervention effects

Low-to-moderate quality meta-analytic evidence shows that motor control stabilisation exercise (MCE) is an effective treatment of non-specific low back pain. A possible approach to overcome the weaknesses of traditional 
Low-to-moderate quality meta-analytic evidence shows that motor control stabilisation exercise (MCE) is an effective treatment of non-specific low back pain. A possible approach to overcome the weaknesses of traditional meta-analyses would be that of a prospective meta-analyses. The aim of the present analysis was to generate high-quality evidence to support the view that motor control stabilisation exercises (MCE) lead to a reduction in pain intensity and disability in non-specific low back pain patients when compared to a control group. In this prospective meta-analysis and sensitivity multilevel meta-regression within the MiSpEx-Network, 18 randomized controlled study arms were included. Participants with non-specific low back pain were allocated to an intervention (individualized MCE, 12 weeks) or a control group (no additive exercise intervention). From each study site/arm, outcomes at baseline, 3 weeks, 12 weeks, and 6 months were pooled. The outcomes were current pain (NRS or VAS, 11 points scale), characteristic pain intensity, and subjective disability. A random effects meta-analysis model for continuous outcomes to display standardized mean differences between intervention and control was performed, followed by sensitivity multilevel meta-regressions. Overall, 2391 patients were randomized; 1976 (3 weeks, short-term), 1740 (12 weeks, intermediate), and 1560 (6 months, sustainability) participants were included in the meta-analyses. In the short-term, intermediate and sustainability, moderate-to-high quality evidence indicated that MCE has a larger effect on current pain (SMD = −0.15, −0.15, −0.19), pain intensity (SMD = −0.19, −0.26, −0.26) and disability (SMD = −0.15, −0.27, −0.25) compared with no exercise intervention. Low-quality evidence suggested that those patients with comparably intermediate current pain and older patients may profit the most from MCE. Motor control stabilisation exercise is an effective treatment for non-specific low back pain. Sub-clinical intermediate pain and middle-aged patients may profit the most from this intervention.
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Metadaten
Author:Daniel Niederer, Tilman Engel, Lutz Vogt, Adamantios Arampatzis, Winfried Banzer, Heidrun Beck, María Moreno Catalá, Michael Brenner-Fliesser, Claas Güthoff, Thore Haag, Alexander Hönning, Ann-Christin Pfeifer, Petra Platen, Marcus Schiltenwolf, Christian Schneider, Katharina Trompeter, Pia-Maria Wippert, Frank Mayer
URN:urn:nbn:de:hebis:30:3-562210
DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm9093058
ISSN:2077-0383
Parent Title (English):Journal of Clinical Medicine
Publisher:MDPI
Place of publication:Basel
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Date of Publication (online):2020/09/22
Date of first Publication:2020/09/22
Publishing Institution:Universitätsbibliothek Johann Christian Senckenberg
Release Date:2020/10/08
Tag:LBP; chronic low back pain; exercise; lumbago; lumbalgia; meta-analysis; nonspecific; sensorimotor; stabilization; unspecific low back pain
motor control exercise
Volume:9
Issue:9, art. 3058
Pagenumber:19
First Page:1
Last Page:19
Note:
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited 
HeBIS PPN:473120070
Institutes:Psychologie und Sportwissenschaften
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medizin und Gesundheit
Sammlungen:Universitätspublikationen
Open-Access-Publikationsfonds:Psychologie und Sportwissenschaften
Licence (German):License LogoCreative Commons - Namensnennung 4.0

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