Mirror-induced behavior in the magpie (Pica pica) : evidence of self-recognition

Comparative studies suggest that at least some bird species have evolved mental skills similar to those found in humans and apes. This is indicated by feats such as tool use, episodic-like memory, and the ability to use 
Comparative studies suggest that at least some bird species have evolved mental skills similar to those found in humans and apes. This is indicated by feats such as tool use, episodic-like memory, and the ability to use one´s own experience in predicting the behavior of conspecifics. It is, however, not yet clear whether these skills are accompanied by an understanding of the self. In apes, self-directed behavior in response to a mirror has been taken as evidence of self-recognition. We investigated mirror-induced behavior in the magpie, a songbird species from the crow family. As in apes, some individuals behaved in front of the mirror as if they were testing behavioral contingencies. When provided with a mark, magpies showed spontaneous mark-directed behavior. Our findings provide the first evidence of mirror self-recognition in a non-mammalian species. They suggest that essential components of human self-recognition have evolved independently in different vertebrate classes with a separate evolutionary history.
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Metadaten
Author:Helmut Prior, Ariane Schwarz, Onur Güntürkün
URN:urn:nbn:de:hebis:30-57921
DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.0060202
ISSN:1545-7885
Parent Title (English):PLoS biology
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Date of Publication (online):2008/10/01
Year of first Publication:2008
Publishing Institution:Univ.-Bibliothek Frankfurt am Main
Release Date:2008/10/01
Note:
© 2008 Prior et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Source:PLoS Biology 6(8): e202 ; doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0060202
HeBIS PPN:206036493
Institutes:Psychologie
Dewey Decimal Classification:590 Tiere (Zoologie)
Sammlungen:Universitätspublikationen
Sondersammelgebiets-Volltexte
Licence (German):License LogoCreative Commons - Namensnennung 3.0

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