The diminishing liquidity premium

Previous evidence suggests that less liquid stocks entail higher average returns. Using NYSE data, we present evidence that both the sensitivity of returns to liquidity and liquidity premia have significantly declined ov
Previous evidence suggests that less liquid stocks entail higher average returns. Using NYSE data, we present evidence that both the sensitivity of returns to liquidity and liquidity premia have significantly declined over the past four decades to levels that we cannot statistically distinguish from zero. Furthermore, the profitability of trading strategies based on buying illiquid stocks and selling illiquid stocks has declined over the past four decades, rendering such strategies virtually unprofitable. Our results are robust to several conventional liquidity measures related to volume. When using liquidity measure that is not related to volume, we find just weak evidence of a liquidity premium even in the early periods of our sample. The gradual introduction and proliferation of index funds and exchange traded funds is a possible explanation for these results. JEL Classification: G12, G14
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Metadaten
Author:Azi Ben-Rephael, Ohad Kadan, Avi Wohl
URN:urn:nbn:de:hebis:30-62317
Series (Serial Number):CFS working paper series (2008, 52)
Document Type:Working Paper
Language:English
Date of Publication (online):2009/01/29
Year of first Publication:2008
Publishing Institution:Univ.-Bibliothek Frankfurt am Main
Release Date:2009/01/29
Tag:Illiquidity ; Liquidity ; Liquidity Premium ; Stock Returns
HeBIS PPN:210305991
Institutes:Center for Financial Studies (CFS)
Dewey Decimal Classification:330 Wirtschaft
Sammlungen:Universitätspublikationen
Licence (German):License Logo Veröffentlichungsvertrag für Publikationen

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