Horticultural markets promote alien species invasions : an Estonian case study of herbaceous perennials

Gardening is a popular pastime, but commercial horticulture is responsible for the introduction of alien species and contributes to invasions in a variety of ways. Although an extensive international literature is availa
Gardening is a popular pastime, but commercial horticulture is responsible for the introduction of alien species and contributes to invasions in a variety of ways. Although an extensive international literature is available on plant invasions, it is still important at the national level to examine the influence of local factors. Accordingly, 17 nurseries in Estonia that cultivated and sold perennial alien species were selected, and a list of species and prices was compiled. The relationships between species status, and factors such as their abundance in the wild were examined statistically. A qualitative list of the nationally problematic species among herbaceous perennials was also completed. A total of 880 taxa were recorded, of which 10.3% were native and 89.7% alien. In all, 87.3% of the alien species were still confined to cultivated areas. The ecological and socio-economic characteristics of the taxa were described, and lists of the families of casual, naturalised and invasive aliens were provided. Both native and increasing wild alien species have a very similar profile on the market. Alien species that are less expensive, widely available and have more cultivars per species on the market are also more likely to escape. The invasive status and abundance of escaped aliens in an area increases with residence time. In general, socio-economic factors create new and reflect previous propagule pressures from commercial horticulture, which continuously increase the likelihood of alien species surviving and invading new areas. Our findings suggest that these national socioeconomic market-related factors explain much of the invasiveness of various perennial ornamental species, and therefore regional and national authorities urgently need to regulate and control the ornamental plant trade to diminish the risk of new invasions. 
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Metadaten
Author:Merle Ööpik, Robert G. H. Bunce, Monika Tischler
URN:urn:nbn:de:hebis:30:3-323788
DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/neobiota.17.4217
Parent Title (English):NeoBiota
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Date of Publication (online):2013/11/21
Date of first Publication:2013/06/28
Publishing Institution:Universitätsbibliothek Johann Christian Senckenberg
Release Date:2013/11/21
Tag:Perennial alien species; commercial horticulture; human-mediated propagule pressure; legislation and regulation; residence time
Issue:17
Pagenumber:19
First Page:19
Last Page:37
HeBIS PPN:363174281
Dewey Decimal Classification:580 Pflanzen (Botanik)
Sammlungen:Sondersammelgebiets-Volltexte
Zeitschriften / Jahresberichte:NeoBiota 17
Journal: Dazugehörige Zeitschrift anzeigen
Licence (German):License LogoCreative Commons - Namensnennung 3.0

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