Goethe's theory of colors between the ancient philosophy, middle ages occultism and modern science

Goethe’s rejection of Newton’s theory of colors is an interesting example of the vulnerability of the human mind—however brilliant it might be—to fanaticism. After an analysis of Goethe’s persistent fascination with magi
Goethe’s rejection of Newton’s theory of colors is an interesting example of the vulnerability of the human mind—however brilliant it might be—to fanaticism. After an analysis of Goethe’s persistent fascination with magic and occultism, of his education, existential experiences, influences, and idiosyncrasies, the authors propose an original interpretation of his anti-Newtonian position. The relevance of Goethe’s Farbenlehre to physics and physiology, from the perspective of modern science, is discussed in detail.
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Metadaten
Author:Victor Bârsan, Andrei Merticariu
URN:urn:nbn:de:hebis:30:3-403330
DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/23311983.2016.1145569
ISSN:2331-1983
Parent Title (English):Cogent arts & humanities
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
Place of publication:London
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Date of Publication (online):2016/02/18
Date of first Publication:2016/02/18
Publishing Institution:Universitätsbibliothek Johann Christian Senckenberg
Release Date:2016/06/02
Tag:ancient philosophy; greek–roman classicism; middle ages science; newtonian science; occultism; optics; pantheism; primordial phenomenon (urphaenomen); theory of colors
Volume:3
Issue:1
Pagenumber:29
First Page:1
Last Page:29
Note:
© 2016 The Author(s). This open access article is distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) 4.0 license.
HeBIS PPN:427940583
Dewey Decimal Classification:100 Philosophie und Psychologie
530 Physik
900 Geschichte und Geografie
Licence (German):License LogoCreative Commons - Namensnennung 4.0

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