A novel osteotomy preparation technique to preserve implant site viability and enhance osteogenesis

  • The preservation of bone viability at an osteotomy site is a critical variable for subsequent implant osseointegration. Recent biomechanical studies evaluating the consequences of site preparation led us to rethink the design of bone-cutting drills, especially those intended for implant site preparation. We present here a novel drill design that is designed to efficiently cut bone at a very low rotational velocity, obviating the need for irrigation as a coolant. The low-speed cutting produces little heat and, consequently, osteocyte viability is maintained. The lack of irrigation, coupled with the unique design of the cutting flutes, channels into the osteotomy autologous bone chips and osseous coagulum that have inherent osteogenic potential. Collectively, these features result in robust, new bone formation at rates significantly faster than those observed with conventional drilling protocols. These preclinical data have practical implications for the clinical preparation of osteotomies and alveolar bone reconstructive surgeries.

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Author:Chih-Hao Chen, Benjamin R. Coyac, Masaki Arioka, Brian Leahy, U. Serdar Tulu, Maziar Aghvami, Stefan Holst, Waldemar Hoffmann, Antony Quarry, Oded Bahat, Benjamin Salmon, John Brunski, Jill A. Helms
URN:urn:nbn:de:hebis:30:3-490859
DOI:https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8020170
ISSN:2077-0383
Pubmed Id:https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30717291
Parent Title (English):Journal of Clinical Medicine
Publisher:MDPI
Place of publication:Basel
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Year of Completion:2019
Date of first Publication:2019/02/01
Publishing Institution:Universit├Ątsbibliothek Johann Christian Senckenberg
Release Date:2019/02/14
Tag:bone chips; bone healing; drilling tool design; osteogenesis; osteotomy
Volume:8
Issue:2, Art. 170
Page Number:13
First Page:1
Last Page:13
Note:
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
HeBIS-PPN:446473642
Institutes:Medizin / Medizin
Dewey Decimal Classification:6 Technik, Medizin, angewandte Wissenschaften / 61 Medizin und Gesundheit / 610 Medizin und Gesundheit
Sammlungen:Universit├Ątspublikationen
Licence (German):License LogoCreative Commons - Namensnennung 4.0