Climate change and Justice between nonoverlapping generations

  • t is becoming less and less controversial that we ought to aggressively combat climate change. One main reason for doing so is concern for future generations, as it is they who will be the most seriously affected by it. Surprisingly, none of the more prominent deontological theories of intergenerational justice can explain why it is wrong for the present generation to do very little to stop worsening the problem. This paper discusses three such theories, namely indirect reciprocity, common ownership of the earth and human rights. It shows that while indirect reciprocity and common ownership are both too undemanding, the human rights approach misunderstands the nature of our intergenerational relationships, thereby capturing either too much or too little about what is problematic about climate change. The paper finally proposes a way to think about intergenerational justice that avoids the pitfalls of the traditional theories and can explain what is wrong with perpetuating climate change.

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Metadaten
Author:Anja Karnein
URN:urn:nbn:de:hebis:30:3-405466
URL:http://www.theglobaljusticenetwork.org/index.php/gjn/article/view/87
ISSN:1835-6842
Parent Title (English):Global justice : theory, practice, rhetoric
Publisher:The Global Justice Network
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Year of Completion:2015
Year of first Publication:2015
Publishing Institution:Universit├Ątsbibliothek Johann Christian Senckenberg
Release Date:2016/07/01
Tag:climate change; common ownership; future generations; human rights; indirect reciprocity; intergenerational justice
Volume:8
Issue:2
Page Number:23
First Page:43
Last Page:65
HeBIS-PPN:399861513
Institutes:Gesellschaftswissenschaften
Dewey Decimal Classification:3 Sozialwissenschaften / 34 Recht / 340 Recht
Sammlungen:Universit├Ątspublikationen
Licence (German):License LogoDeutsches Urheberrecht