Predicting the requirement for renal replacement therapy in intensive care patients with sepsis

  • Sepsis is one of the most frequent causes of acute kidney injury (AKI) in critically ill patients, with initial organ impairment often followed by dysfunction in other systems. Renal dysfunction may therefore represent one facet in the evolution towards multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) or, alternatively, may be indicative of system-wide endothelial damage caused by hyperinflammation and a positive fluid balance. Whilst numerous biomarkers have been investigated to predict renal replacement therapy (RRT) requirement, including NGAL, TIMP-2 and IGFBP-7, mid-regional proadrenomedullin (MR-proADM) may also be of interest due to its involvement in capillary leakage, endothelial dysfunction and the initial stages of multiple organ failure development. ...

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Author:Axel Nierhaus, Frank Bloos, Darius Cameron Wilson, Gunnar Elke, Patrick MeybohmORCiDGND
URN:urn:nbn:de:hebis:30:3-465366
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1186/s13054-018-2135-5
ISSN:1466-609X
ISSN:1364-8535
Pubmed Id:https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30122149
Parent Title (English):Critical care
Publisher:BioMed Central ; Springer
Place of publication:London ; Berlin ; Heidelberg
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Year of Completion:2018
Date of first Publication:2018/08/20
Publishing Institution:Universit├Ątsbibliothek Johann Christian Senckenberg
Contributing Corporation:SepNet Critical Care Trials Group
Release Date:2018/08/30
Volume:22
Issue:1, Art. 201
Page Number:3
First Page:1
Last Page:3
Note:
Open Access: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
HeBIS-PPN:453770738
Institutes:Medizin / Medizin
Dewey Decimal Classification:6 Technik, Medizin, angewandte Wissenschaften / 61 Medizin und Gesundheit / 610 Medizin und Gesundheit
Sammlungen:Universit├Ątspublikationen
Licence (German):License LogoCreative Commons - Namensnennung 4.0